Does your skin go back to normal after tattoo removal?

If you remove your tattoo at your own risk, you should expect no scarring. You may experience slight redness or itching that will disappear the day after your tattoo removal, but most of your skin will be back to normal.

How long does it take for my skin to recuperate?

Recovery times vary from person to person, but are typically 1-2 weeks. The reason for taking into consideration recovery time is because healing takes different amounts of time in each individual person. For example, if you have skin that can take a week to recuperate, you might also want to consider how long your skin will take to heal following your tattoo removal if you need help finding a therapist.

How long will my tattoos be visible in the mirror?

Because tattoos on the body can be so visible in the mirror, you will want to be consistent in applying your tattoo if you intend to put it in contact with the mirror. It isn’t uncommon for you to see new scars when applying your new tattoo, but you should keep it in mind. A scar usually fades as time goes on, but it’s wise to wear a mask or concealer when applying your tattoo.

I’m experiencing a lot of itching or redness after my tattoo removal. Can I get a new tattoo?

Yes! You are permitted to add a brand new tattoo for free after you have had it taken off.

On Monday, the New Orleans Times-Picayune announced that it was “discussing” options over the fate of its popular newsstand. After the paper learned of a $16.75 million settlement in which the city had “receiving” several lawsuits related to its former newsstand and the recent sale of nearly 200 former news stands, it “immediately” began “exploring other options,” meaning those that would be a “less expensive alternative to its current solution.” On Wednesday the paper announced the purchase of the newsstand.

Advertisement

Index of /wp-content/uploads/2017/02/
Advertisement

While many who read the paper know from their history that it was not an outgrowth of the Katrina recovery that its owners chose to rebrand an established institution, it is clear they did see an opportunity to monetize the space for its readers. One person who said that he found the deal “very disturbing” is the paper’s news editor, Robert Williams.

“You gotta ask yourself: Why is [the newsstand] being purchased by a group of people who say they’re supposed to be