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In this study, we explore the impact of various dietary patterns on the human metabolism in relation to obesity. Analyses of 25,000 participants across 5 years with a standardized dietary intake of 1500 kcal/day were performed at 8 sites in Sweden and the United States. Participants consumed a typical U.S. diet of white bread (n=11,000 women, n=9,000 men), sweet potatoes (n=9,000 women, n=7,000 men), vegetables (n=8,000 women, n=5,000 men), fish (n=10,000 women, n=7,000 men), and red meat (n=9,000 women, n=6,000 men). We conducted regression analyses to investigate the relation between dietary patterns and metabolic risk factors, including blood pressure, blood lipids, and insulin sensitivity. The dietary pattern group with the lowest carbohydrate intakes (low GI) had a 3% lower risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease than the group with high carbohydrate intake (high GI; P<0.001), whereas the intake of sweet potatoes and vegetables had the opposite effects, increasing the risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease more than 1.5-fold (P<0.001). Moreover, in women in the low-GI group the risk of obesity increased (HR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.93) compared with the high-GI group. Among overweight women, the risk of obesity was increased (HR=1.50, 95% CI: 1.00, 2.03) with the consumption of sweet potatoes and vegetables compared with the consumption of white bread and fish. However, the intake of red meat was not a risk variable in either group. Our results suggest that there is no specific nutritional profile for weight control among obese individuals, and that some dietary patterns may increase one's risk of obesity and disease.

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