Is it hard to learn guitar by yourself?

Is it easy to have fun and practice with friends? If it was up to me, yes. But it’s not up to me anymore.

And so we are now in a very different space. We are in the time of the electronic age. You want to be as productive, as focused, as creative, as fast as possible. As one of your teachers stated, it’s about using your instrument in the most efficient way possible, with the least amount of time spent on learning music theory. You want to use the instrument as a musical instrument – as a musical tool, a musical instrument that is meant to make music with.

So what does that look like? Are we there?

Well let’s talk for a second about what this means to you as a guitarist…

Tips & Advice with JustinGuitar! - Andertons Music Co.
If you don’t know what “harmonic technique” means, have a listen to this video…

So I think our instruments are the new guitar techniques…

Are they?

They are, you see, and a lot of people are falling for this as we are.

But it all starts here. Let’s jump in.

Okay first, the concept of “harmonic technique”

“Harmonic technique” or “tonal technique” describes the technique of harmonizing two pitches together, usually between two chords or a melody…

What else can it mean?

Harmonic technique is the concept that a harmonic progression is formed, usually between two pitches or two melodies, where pitches on the same harmonic system are combined (or transposed) into some new system (a “tone or key”). The new system usually includes some new modes, intervals and modes of pitches. Some examples of harmonic technique are:

Triadic harmony – in the example above where C is in Am, E is in A, Ab is in Bb and Am is in C. This is called Triadic harmony.

– in the example above where C is in Am, E is in A, Ab is in Bb and Am is in C. This is called Triadic harmony. Chord harmony – the key is F#. Then G is in Bb or Cb, A is in D, and Ab is in C.

– the key is F#. Then G is in Bb or Cb, A is in D, and Ab is in C. Scale harmony – where G is in Bb or Db and B is