How do I write a grant?

You may need to submit a proposal through a research portal or you may wish to apply via Grants.gov/apply. If you are applying through Grants.gov, please be sure your project meets the criteria for the application.

If you are submitting through Grants.gov, please contact the Grants.gov Research Policy Office by phone at (855) 922-5900.

What information must I submit?

Project details (a list of eligible collaborators, project goals, funding request, deadline for submission) and funding details (an outline of all sources of funding, estimated dollar value, expected completion date, list of referees, and any associated information) are all required. All project information is submitted through the funding portal. For more information on the applications process, visit Grants.gov.

What if I have problems with the
In”>application?

In the unlikely event that you face technical difficulties in completing an application for an NIH-supported research project, please contact the NIH Grants.gov research policy office to discuss how to resolve the situation.

If you have problems with your grant application, the NIH uses the following checklist to help you troubleshoot:

How to add notes to your proposal

How to improve your proposal

How to change or add information to your proposal

How to change the project’s deadline

How to submit your project to NIH (i.e., include the Project ID in your proposal)

What if I do not meet the requirements for the grant application?

If you are not able to meet all the project requirements, contact the Grants.gov office listed above within 45 days of submitting your application to discuss alternative arrangements.

If you are still unable to meet all the project requirements, the NIH grants.gov Research Policy Office will assign a representative to represent you in a review process to make sure their assistance is provided. If your application is approved, the representative will provide you with all information they need to complete your project project (including the project status and funding), contact materials, and information about all other resources that are available to work with you.

How many people is the NIH hiring?

The NIH currently employs an initial cohort of approximately 80 researchers (including 12 grantees), and is actively searching more than 160 other individuals as they are hired.

How long does it take the NIH to process my application and grant application?

The NIH is able to process applications faster than it can schedule them—approximately one